Digital Nomad Visas – Lost Nomad http://lostnomad.org/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 19:40:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 http://lostnomad.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/lost-nomad-icon-150x150.png Digital Nomad Visas – Lost Nomad http://lostnomad.org/ 32 32 Travel to Costa Rica during Covid-19: what you need to know before you go http://lostnomad.org/travel-to-costa-rica-during-covid-19-what-you-need-to-know-before-you-go-2/ http://lostnomad.org/travel-to-costa-rica-during-covid-19-what-you-need-to-know-before-you-go-2/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 16:51:48 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/travel-to-costa-rica-during-covid-19-what-you-need-to-know-before-you-go-2/

If you plan to Trip in Costa Rica, here’s what you need to know and expect if you want to visit during the global coronavirus pandemic.

The basics

Costa Rica reopened to tourism in November 2020. The country has eased restrictions in recent weeks and plans to create a digital nomad visa to attract visitors who will make a lasting contribution to the local economy.

However, a new wave of the virus is taking off, with hospitals now “dangerously full” and the country on watch lists of other states.

What’s on offer

Costa Rica is known for its “pura vida” (pure life) and, apart from the pandemic, la vida is still pura here. It is a country for nature lovers, with both a Caribbean and Pacific coast, and a jungle covering around a quarter of the country. Whether you are here for the cloud forests, volcanoes, or the incredible nature and wildlife, your shoulders are sure to drop a few inches. Most visitors pass through the capital San José as just a passing point, but it’s a beautiful city, with stunning architecture, public art, and museums.

Who can go

Everyone. Costa Rica reopened – even for tourism – on November 1, 2020. However, there are of course restrictions. And the standard visa regulations still apply.

What are the restrictions?

It is not necessary to have a negative Covid-19 PCR test result as it was initially. All passengers must complete a Health Pass before the journey. The website gives a QR code which you must present on arrival.

Tourists traveling to Costa Rica must have valid travel insurance, which covers potential quarantine accommodation of up to $ 2,000 and medical costs of at least $ 50,000 related to Covid-19. This must be accompanied by a certificate in English or Spanish, mentioning the name of the policyholder, the dates of cover and the guarantees as stipulated above.

If you cannot purchase a policy that includes quarantine insurance, you can find suggested insurers on the Health Pass website.

Residents and Costa Rican nationals may be subject to self-isolation upon arrival.

The land borders, which had been closed to non-residents, reopened on April 5 to visitors who do not need a visa. The previous 14-day quarantine for people entering by land was also abolished on April 5.

American CDC classifies the risk in Costa Rica as “very high” and says that US citizens should “avoid all travel to Costa Rica”. Even fully vaccinated travelers are at risk of catching variants, he says. He kept that advice until June, even though he downgraded other countries with high infection rates.

Meanwhile, the UK has added Costa Rica to its “red list,” meaning travelers from there will be subject to around 40 hotels on June 3.

What is the situation of the Covid?

Costa Rica has recorded more than 336,000 cases and 4,278 deaths during the pandemic, as of June 10. The number of cases is increasing rapidly during the second wave – they doubled in April.

According to the government, May saw record infection rates. Nearly 68,000 new cases were recorded in May, a record since the start of the pandemic. It also saw 810 people lose their lives – a record set to be broken in June. In the past four weeks, 848 people have died.

On April 28, authorities warned that patients had to wait for hospital beds; two weeks later there was 432 Covid patients in intensive care nationwide, well above the optimal maximum number of 359. By May 20 the number had increased to 520. This is the most comprehensive services have been to date during the pandemic.

May 5, OPS – the Pan American Health Organization – has warned that hospitals in the region are “dangerously full”.

Along with Mexico, Costa Rica was one of the first countries in Latin America to receive vaccines in December. Over 1.9 million doses of vaccination have been administered to date, with a total of 13.6% of the population fully vaccinated. The government asked for help from Europe and the United States, using the COVAX diet.

What can visitors expect?

Things are returning to relative normality. National parks and beaches are open – the latter until 6 p.m. Restaurants and bars have reopened, but clubs haven’t, and concerts and large groups are prohibited. However, businesses must close at 11 p.m.

There is a nighttime curfew from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. Driving restrictions, which had ended, have been reinstated in an attempt to stabilize infection rates. This is done via the license plates. cars with plates ending in even numbers can run on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Cars with plates ending in odd numbers can run on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. There is a total ban on driving from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.

The beaches are open from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. National parks allow a capacity of 50%. The bars are operating at 25% of their capacity and the hotels at 75%. Concerts, discos, fairs and other large gatherings are prohibited.

In a recovery attempt, the country plans to deploy year-round visa for digital nomads, with the possibility of renewal for an additional year. Currently, tourist stays are limited to 90 days. Applicants will be able to take their families with them and will not be subject to income tax. Digital nomads have flocked to Costa Rica These last months.

Authorities did not reinstate new restrictions for Easter week, traditionally a peak travel time, but instead urged citizens play it safe. Instead, they suggested people go to national parks, where they can be safer outside while help revive the tourism sector.

Although the number of cases is increasing, tourists continue to arrive. Dutch airline KLM announced he will resume direct flights June 29.

Useful links

Visit Costa Rica

CNE

Tico’s time

Our recent coverage

Last August, Costa Rica was one of the first countries to allow American entry, opening visitors to six US states. Or read about it reforestation project for large green macaws. Ready to book? Check what to do in San José.


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Before ZDNW 2021, answers to the Zagreb Digital Nomad FAQ http://lostnomad.org/before-zdnw-2021-answers-to-the-zagreb-digital-nomad-faq/ http://lostnomad.org/before-zdnw-2021-answers-to-the-zagreb-digital-nomad-faq/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 08:01:26 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/before-zdnw-2021-answers-to-the-zagreb-digital-nomad-faq/

June 11, 2021 – 10 days before the start of Zagreb Digital Nomad Week, answers to some frequently asked questions.

How to apply for the digital nomadic license?

The Croatian Digital Nomadic Permit entered into force on January 1, 2021, with an online application process launched on March 1, 2021. This allows nationals of non-EU / EEA countries who meet the criteria to live and work in Croatia only once. -month period. You can see all the official conditions here.

You can apply for the permit online via the website of the Ministry of the Interior here.

How long does the request last?

The application process is extremely recent and there is not yet enough data to give an accurate forecast. The fastest approval I know of is two weeks, while others have taken a few months. Two things that seem to be slowing things down are the confirmation of the background check by law enforcement authorities in the home country and the need for an apostille. Things seem to vary from candidate to candidate from country to country.

How many people have applied so far, where are they from and how many have been approved?

As of June 10, 2021, there have been 120 digital nomad permit applications, of which 37 have been approved, 9 rejected / withdrawn and the remainder pending. The largest number of applicants came from the United States, the United Kingdom and Russia. The number of applications is expected to improve dramatically once borders open fully and travel is less restrictive.

Do I have to apply from outside Croatia?

It depends on your personal situation. If you need a visa to enter Croatia then yes (unless you get the visa, enter and apply). Several nomads who can enter for 90 days have started the process from inside the country.

How do I prove my income?

The financial prerequisite for the permit is that applicants either have proof of funds up to 202,890 kuna for the 12 months (plus 10% each for a partner and family member), or they can prove a monthly income of 16,907.50. Proof of income for the last three months of this amount via bank statements is sufficient.

What about taxation?

Digital license holders are not subject to Croatian income tax during their stay, but there are of course many other taxes. Kristina Grbavac of KPMG Croatia has been a strong supporter of the Digital Nomads initiative, and she gave excellent tax insight in an interview with TCN. You can contact Kristina directly through the KPMG Croatia website.

Are there coworking spaces in Zagreb?

Yes! The scene is growing rapidly, with more co-working spaces added each month. Discover BIZkoshnica, HUB385, Impact Hub Zagreb, InstantOffice Zagreb, Matrix Office Park, Virtual Office Croatia, Wespa Spaces and ZICER – Zagreb Innovation Center.

Where can I find information on the digital nomad scene in Zagreb?

There are dedicated Facebook groups:

Digital nomads Croatia

Digital nomads Zagreb

as good as

The Digital Nomad Croatia association.

and the TCN section dedicated to digital nomads.

The Zagreb Tourist Board will soon offer its own dedicated digital nomad section.

Is there a large community of digital nomads in Zagreb?

In terms of an organized community right now, I would say no, but things are moving fast. In terms of the number of nomads living in the city, I would say there are quite a few and they are growing fast. Croatia is “in” as a hotspot for digital nomads, and less restrictive travel will see a significant increase. It is only a matter of time before the community gets organized further.

Many nomads move towards the coast and the Croatian islands. Why Zagreb?

Zagreb and the coast are perfect partners in showing why Croatia is a fantastic nomadic destination, based on safety, authentic experiences and a lifestyle. Digital nomads by definition are nomads, and travel between the capital and the coast is natural.

As the largest city in Croatia, Zagreb has an increasingly international atmosphere. Its Austro-Hungarian heritage has echoes of Prague and Vienna, but at a cheaper price. Its parks and outdoor cafes are a delight to stroll and linger, while the surrounding area is full of additional tourist options. You can find out more about the Around the Zagreb site.

How can I check the internet speed for a location in Zagreb?

nikolin-pejovic-ht-map.jpg

Hrvatski Telekom has an online map of Croatia, where you can check the internet speed from any address.

Are there any simple prepaid digital nomad products to connect to Zagreb?

Hrvatski Telekom has developed a special product for digital nomads without the need for bureaucracy or contracts. The prepaid SIM card offers 7 days of unlimited FLAT mobile data access with 4G / LTE speed up to 600 Mbit / s. The price is 85 kuna (11 euros) and can be recharged weekly for 60 kuna. More details here.

How easy is it to find long-term accommodation in Zagreb?

Finding long-term accommodation in Zagreb is much easier than on the coast, as the city caters to people who rent for longer periods and not just short-term tourists. Additionally, the future of tourism is changing, with AirBnB reporting that so far 25% of bookings in 2021 have been made over 28 days and more. This will naturally lead to changes in the rental market. the Digital Nomad Association Croatia will offer approved accommodation specifically for digital nomads.

How to meet people?

Zagreb is an extremely relaxed and social city, and it won’t be long before you fall in love with the cafe culture. Conversations inevitably begin with people at the next table and new friendships are formed. Are you new to the city and looking for other expats? Facebook group Expats in Zagreb Official is a great resource, with many locals and expats sharing their experiences, setting up get-togethers, and helping newcomers with information.

What about health insurance?

Digital nomads who apply for the permit are required to have health insurance. This can be purchased abroad or through the Croatian health system.

Is English widely spoken?

Absolutely. Croats have some of the best English skills in the EU, and you will have no problem communicating in Zagreb and beyond. The older generation may not speak as fluently, but visitors are surprised at the level of fluency. German is also widely spoken in Zagreb.

How secure is Zagreb?

Croatia is one of the safest countries in Europe and many visitors comment on the safety in the city. There is very little delinquency and single women can go home late at night without a problem. I know several people in the Croatian diaspora who moved to Croatia from countries like Australia and the United States because Croatia was a much safer place to raise their children.

Where can I find information on Zagreb Digital Nomad Week 2021 and Zagreb Digital Nomad Ambassador Project?

ZDNW 2021 will take place from June 21 to 27, 2021 in various locations in the Croatian capital. Online registration for the event will be available on the Saltwater Nomads website. Participation, online and in person, is free, but please note that physical participation will be limited due to epidemiological measures.

ZDNW 2021 will have 7 themes over 7 days: cybersecurity, online presence, remote careers, wellness, the future of work, tax and finance, and exploring Zagreb.

The Zagreb Digital Nomad Ambassador project will run from July 1 to December 31, with 6 winners receiving free accommodation for one month, working with the city to improve Zagreb’s digital nomad offering. You wish to apply?

For the latest news and features regarding digital nomads in Croatia, check out the dedicated TCN section.


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Miami-based tech startup named Bitcoin 2021 pitch day finalist http://lostnomad.org/miami-based-tech-startup-named-bitcoin-2021-pitch-day-finalist/ http://lostnomad.org/miami-based-tech-startup-named-bitcoin-2021-pitch-day-finalist/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 16:30:00 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/miami-based-tech-startup-named-bitcoin-2021-pitch-day-finalist/

At Pitch Day, the co-founders Rogelio Caceres and Yuri Lau explained the company’s mission, which is to connect Bitcoin investors with global mobility assets – including second passports, “golden visas” and foreign residence permits such as digital nomad visas – that allow sovereign individuals of unimpeded access and rights of establishment worldwide.

“Citizens of Bitcoin were honored to participate in Bitcoin 2021, right here at Miami, our hometown and ‘the capital of the capital’, ”said Caceres, who is the CEO. “Global mobility assets are accelerating Bitcoin adoption by removing unnecessary restrictions on the movement of human capital.

The jury included billionaire Bitcoin investor Tim draper and Kevin o’leary of “Shark Tank.” The winners were 24 Exchange, a multi-asset class trading platform, and Satoshi’s Games, a video game developer.

Citizens of Bitcoin’s target audience are people who embrace a location-independent, technology-based lifestyle that allows them to travel and work remotely anywhere in the world that is connected to the internet. They want lower taxes, freedom of movement and immerse themselves in a Bitcoin world. They unveiled the Satoshi Experience and the Nakamoto Expedition, fully immersive year-long programs for digital nomads to live and work in the best Bitcoin-enabled destinations, including Miami.

From behind the company’s booth and at private events, Citizens of Bitcoin representatives met with over 500 attendees at Bitcoin 2021, which took place June 4 and 5.

Citizens of Bitcoin is the first network launched by the Global Residency & Citizenship Group (Global RCG), a Miamiinvestment advisory firm based on the creation of the world’s first mobility asset platform

The launch of the tech startup coincides with a national desire to travel abroad and rediscover the world. As Americans invest in Bitcoin, global mobility assets will dramatically improve the realization of their decentralized and world-oriented interests. For them, there is Citizens of Bitcoin: Where Plan B becomes Plan A.

Media contact:
Rogelio Caceres
(786) 373-7988
[email protected]

SOURCE Global RCG

Related links

https://globalrcg.com


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Creating a sustainable, post-Covid travel industry http://lostnomad.org/creating-a-sustainable-post-covid-travel-industry/ http://lostnomad.org/creating-a-sustainable-post-covid-travel-industry/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 13:53:30 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/creating-a-sustainable-post-covid-travel-industry/

Kudadoo, a private island in the Maldives, designed to run entirely on solar energy. CREDIT: Kudadoo

While the Covid-19 pandemic has put the world in lockdown and slowed down travel, the environmental side effects have been undeniably beneficial. Air pollution in cities dropped dramatically, for example, as fish could again be seen in the canals of Venice. And, with tourism accounting for at least 5% of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2019, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organization, it is clear that some forms of transport are incompatible with the sustainable development agenda. But borders are reopening and international travel resumes, so what to do?

Even before the pandemic, there was an increase in awareness of consumers and brands built on sustainability.

Capitalize on increased consumer awareness

Even before Covid stopped long-haul travel, consumer interest in sustainability was growing. TUI Group reported an 84% increase in the number of its customers choosing “greener and fairer” vacation packages between 2015 and 2020, for example.

Observing this trend, Cat Jones founded the flightless travel company Byway in March 2020. “Even before the pandemic, there had been an increase in consumer awareness and in the number of businesses built on sustainability,” says- it. “With the first lockdown coming, I knew if there was ever a time to give people a travel experience based on not stealing, this was it.”

Covid gives us “a unique opportunity to do things differently

Japan is one of the many markets where the green travel industry has yet to make much headway, but young consumers are increasingly concerned about sustainability issues, reports Kenji Itakura, deputy sales manager of the Tokyu Group. Hotels. With the aim of attracting millennial travelers in particular, his company implements sustainable development practices throughout its real estate portfolio and adopts new technologies.

Top destinations

The Kawasaki King Skyfront Tokyu Rei Hotel is for example the first “hydrogen hotel” in the world, generating all its energy from plastic and food waste. Itakura notes that it was developed as part of a project launched by the Ministry of the Environment in 2015 “to fight pollution and efficiently use hydrogen energy”.

This type of public sector support is vital for the pursuit of innovation in travel. As Byway builds the complex dynamic packaging technology that will underpin his product, he was supported by an Innovate UK grant of £ 100,000, which Jones describes as “exceptionally useful”.

Alexandra Pastollnigg is the founder of Fair Voyage, an online travel agency specializing in socially and environmentally responsible travel to low-income countries. She believes Covid has offered the industry “a unique opportunity to do things differently,” but governments must first lead the way with sustainability plans and investments.

It seems a lot of people expect a company to come up with some sort of technological silver bullet. But it won’t be in our lifetime.

Travel was already a low-margin, high-competition industry before the arrival of Covid-19. The pandemic has created additional pressure, with consumers expecting low prices and free cancellations to tempt them to return,

“Local travel agencies, tour operators and travel companies haven’t had customers for a long time and are struggling to survive,” says Pastollnigg. “The harsh economic reality is that few companies can afford to pay a sustainability premium.”

Hence the need for government incentives. In the United Arab Emirates, the Ras Al Khaimah Tourism Development Authority provides an example. The authority, established by the government of Ras Al Khaimah in 2011, has used the hiatus in international travel to reinforce the emirate’s focus on sustainability.

Presenting itself as “the emirate of nature”, Ras Al Khaimah has decided to target socially and environmentally conscious travelers and is investing in developments aligned with this objective. The May 2021 announcement of £ 96million in funding for the sector shows that the emirate is genuinely “serious about investing in sustainable tourism,” according to the authority’s CEO Raki Phillips.

Technological innovation in the luxury travel market

On the luxury side, there is more financial freedom to innovate. For example, New York-based firm Yuji Yamazaki Architecture designed Kudadoo, a fully solar-powered private island in the Maldives, in 2018.

“It was a big design statement and a big investment at the time,” says the firm’s lead architect Yuji Yamazaki. “But, as the price of solar panels drops, I hope solar becomes a more viable option for many small projects, especially in equatorial countries.”

Although Kudadoo remains largely “symbolic” for now, according to Yamazaki, its renewable energy production system could be adopted more widely in the Maldives in the longer term. The low-lying archipelago is extremely vulnerable to sea level rise and its tourism industry is far from sustainable. In 2019, the sector accounted for 40% of the country’s total CO emissions2 emissions, more than three quarters of which are due to electricity production.

The negative impacts of Covid on sustainability

According to the World Bank, tourism directly accounts for around 25% of the Maldives ‘economy, which contracted by around 28% in 2020. In many territories that rely heavily on holidaymakers’ incomes, Covid has not offered a golden opportunity for ecosystems to recover. On the contrary, local people have suffered, while conservation programs based on tourism have failed.

Paul Gardiner is CEO of Mantis Collection, a company that owns “eco-lodges” and hotels on all continents. Although the company is investing in exciting projects at its eco-lodge innovation center in South Africa’s Eastern Cape province, it reports that the focus has been on damage limitation.

In 2018, Mantis and French hotel giant Accor entered into a partnership to create a non-profit company called Community Conservation Fund Africa (CCFA) with the aim of tackling social and ecological issues on the continent. Throughout the Covid pandemic, the CCFA distributed thousands of food packages to communities affected by the sharp drop in tourism income. The goal, Gardiner says, has been to “help them get through this terrible time and also prevent them from having to poach wildlife to support themselves.”

The harsh economic reality is that few companies can afford to pay a sustainability premium

At the same time, Mantis continued to invest in innovative business models and initiatives, including the ‘Adopt a Beehive’ campaign, in which ‘CCFA donates beehives to local communities, trains people in beekeeping, and then purchases the honey to be used in the properties of Mantis’.

The complex path to industry-wide change

“I think a lot of people expect a company to produce some kind of technological miracle solution that will allow us to perform 20 long-haul flights a year without environmental impact. It won’t happen in our lifetime, ”predicts Simon Willmore, Chairman of the British Guild of Travel Writers and Digital Manager at Bradt Travel Guides.

Instead, there will be more “intangible” innovations, including digital nomadic visas. Jurisdictions ranging from Croatia to Bermuda have established them to “allow people to visit new places, but with a ‘travel less, stay longer’ mantra,” he says.

It is clear that the path to sustainability in the travel industry is not straightforward, but innovators are helping to chart a course. And they respond to a clear public interest in sustainable tourism. But the real question is: will travel-hungry consumers be ready, once Covid restrictions are finally lifted, to put their money where their mouth is?



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A Beginner’s Guide to Remote Working http://lostnomad.org/a-beginners-guide-to-remote-working/ http://lostnomad.org/a-beginners-guide-to-remote-working/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 13:30:00 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/a-beginners-guide-to-remote-working/

While a change of scenery every month has worked for the Gillespies, staying in one place may be more appealing to others: Valeria says staying in a town has helped her develop a good work routine and made it easier to plan for. excursions which did not seem to him to be rushed. Finding that sweet spot can be important in avoiding burnout.

Actually doing the job

Think remote working is all about adjusting the jet and logging in from the beach? It is also a matter of work. Whitney whitehouse, a photographer who lives and travels across the United States in her van with her dog, says one of the hardest parts of working on the road is just putting in hours. “For me, one of the biggest challenges is finding the discipline to sit at the computer and work,” says Whitehouse. Chelsea Gillespie agrees: “You have to live like you’re not on vacation. You have to find your balance.

The Gillespies and Whitehouse advise setting up or identifying a designated workspace where you can switch to work mode. Chad Wyatt, Founder of Remote jobs co, says it’s important to set a timeline and boundaries. “If you need to work, use a coworking space or a private room,” he says. “Don’t work in a hostel, at the beach, in a bar or anywhere around other people. It’s not the activities that tempt you, it’s the people who influence you to do things. If someone says to you, “Let’s go to the beach and have some beer,” it would be hard to say no. “

Other considerations include access to Wi-Fi, says remote blogger Valeria. While a beachfront bungalow may seem idyllic, not being able to easily or regularly connect to work and team meetings can quickly turn into a nightmare scenario. It is common practice to ask your landlord what the internet speed is (you will need at least 1.5 megabits per second to respond to web conferencing requests, which can be difficult to achieve if others are using the Internet. even Wi-Fi). As an alternative, you can look for coworking spaces that guarantee a good web connection or buy your own personal Wi-Fi hotspot.

Connect with others

Many large cities already have remote work communities built in, and you just have to find them. Edwards recommends searching Facebook for groups that have the destination and words like “traveler” or “expat” in the title (like “”Expats in Costa Rica“). Often these groups are great places to meet other people and can get answers to your questions about local life. There are also several general websites for expats that can help you, such as the Expat Network and International citizens, which connect travelers and contain a wealth of information on everything from getting visas to acquiring a local phone number.

Yet even with these libraries of information, many remote workers find loneliness one of the biggest challenges of living in a new place. Wyatt argues that you shouldn’t be afraid to try and make friends the old-fashioned way – there are a lot of people in the same boat. “At first it will be intimidating to speak openly to a stranger, but you’ll find that those strangers will probably want to talk to someone as well,” Wyatt said. “If you’re looking to make more lasting friends, I’d say try a local gym, take a class, take a field trip, or do something where you kind of have to talk to people.”

The inevitable logistics

While working from anywhere might seem glamorous, there are a myriad of unsexy details to work out, including paying taxes, getting insurance, and having an emergency plan in the event of an accident, natural disaster. or, you know, a global pandemic.




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Dubai among 10 fastest growing remote work centers in the world in 2021 – News http://lostnomad.org/dubai-among-10-fastest-growing-remote-work-centers-in-the-world-in-2021-news/ http://lostnomad.org/dubai-among-10-fastest-growing-remote-work-centers-in-the-world-in-2021-news/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 12:22:52 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/dubai-among-10-fastest-growing-remote-work-centers-in-the-world-in-2021-news/

The one-year visa allows professionals around the world to live and work remotely from the UAE, even if their companies are based in another country.

Dubai has been ranked among the 10 fastest growing cities in the world for remote working with US cities Miami and Denever.

According to an analysis by Nomad List, Dubai is the sixth fastest growing remote work center after three Mexican cities of Cancun, Playa del Carmen and Tulum; Spanish city of Tenerife in the Canary Islands and Miami in the United States.

The other cities that make the top 10 list are Mexico City, Las Palmas in the Canary Islands, Medellin in Colombia and Denver in the United States.

In March 2021, the United Arab Emirates announced visas for professionals working remotely abroad who may reside in the United Arab Emirates.

The one-year visa allows professionals from all over the world to live and work remotely from the UAE, even if their companies are based in another country. They can stay in UAE under their own sponsorship. They can work in accordance with the “terms and conditions issued with the visa”.

Nomad List is following the movement of tens of thousands of digital nomads to spot the trending places to live and work remotely right now, and find the next place that might be. Nomad List showed that the registration of digital nomads increased by 71% in 2021 in Dubai and by 53% between 2016 and 2020. There are currently around 1,800 remote workers in Dubai, he said.

Chad Astmann, global co-head of investment management at Korn Ferry, said in a note that emboldened by the rapid pace of vaccinations and the possibility of being together again without masks, a small but growing number of heads of company is not backing down. to express their true feelings about working remotely – and it’s clear they’re skeptical about whether this produces the best results. “In a recent survey, around 84% of CEOs said they wanted employees to come back to the office this year, for example. One CEO described people who want to work from home as less engaged than those who come to the office, while another executive described remote working as inferior to the office “for those who want to scramble,” Astmann said . – waheedabbas@khaleejtimes.com

Journalist



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Digital Nomads: A trend that will intensify in the years to come http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomads-a-trend-that-will-intensify-in-the-years-to-come/ http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomads-a-trend-that-will-intensify-in-the-years-to-come/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 07:03:34 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomads-a-trend-that-will-intensify-in-the-years-to-come/

While there are not many surveys available on the number of digital nomads these days, someone can easily conclude that this trend is on the rise in recent times, mainly due to the special conditions created by the pandemic.

Digital nomads are people who work remotely from different parts of the world and not necessarily from an office. They can work from a hotel room in Barbados or Paris or even a vacation home in Greek islands like Santorini or Mykonos. They can accomplish their daily tasks with the help of technology and connectivity.

Many countries around the world are implementing specific policies and encouraging digital nomads and their families to move there. Among these countries is also Greece. Many digital nomads from abroad already live in Athens and Crete. Rhodes is another Greek island that is preparing specific policies and infrastructure in order to become attractive to digital nomads from abroad. Another phenomenon observed also in Greece reinforcing this trend is that many Greeks who previously worked abroad have decided to leave their offices and settle in Greece and now work remotely. These people do not necessarily choose to stay in Athens but also in many other beautiful regions of Greece. When it comes to other parts of the world, Dubai and Mexico are among the most attractive destinations for digital nomads.

According to a survey by MBO partners of more than 3,000 American adults, the number of digital nomads has increased from 7.3 million in 2019 to 10.9 million in 2020. A recent research report from the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA) described the digital profile. nomads. According to ATTA, most digital nomads are freelancers for multiple companies (36%), own their own business (33%), work as a regular employee for a specific company (21%), or work as consultants for a specific company (5%). Digital nomads work an average of 46 hours per week. The report also states that 20% of those surveyed have become digital nomads in 2020, possibly due to COVID-19. Finally, ATTA presents the best destinations for long stays. These destinations are Indonesia, Mexico, Thailand, Spain, Colombia and Portugal.

If anyone wants to know what conditions a destination must have to be chosen by a digital nomad, ATTA makes it clear in its report that a reliable internet connection, good weather and low cost of living are the most important. Of course, living in a suitable place near the beach or other attractions is more important for digital nomads than having other amenities. Digital nomads usually look for destinations where it is easy to obtain and renew a visa. If a place does not require a visa, it comes first in the list of digital nomads.

Some other data shows that the majority of digital nomads are between 28 and 34 years old, while an equally high percentage includes people between 35 and 41 years old. In addition, 59% are men and 40% are women.

The year 2021 seems to be the year of the digital nomads. However, this trend will not fade, but will increase in the years to come. Predictions indicate that the number of digital nomads will reach one billion over the next decade. Over time, remote workers will have more job opportunities, better wages, and more technological tools to do their jobs faster and easier. Additionally, business leaders are beginning to realize the benefits of hiring remote workers. The main advantage is that they will have to pay less for renting office space. At the same time, teleworkers appear to be more productive because when they have the opportunity to work flexible hours, they are more satisfied.

Follow the latest news live on CEOWORLD magazine and get updates from the US and around the world. The opinions expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of CEOWORLD magazine. Follow CEOWORLD magazine on Twitter and
Facebook. For media inquiries, please contact: info@ceoworld.biz




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Travel to Costa Rica during Covid-19: what you need to know before you go http://lostnomad.org/travel-to-costa-rica-during-covid-19-what-you-need-to-know-before-you-go/ http://lostnomad.org/travel-to-costa-rica-during-covid-19-what-you-need-to-know-before-you-go/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 11:58:03 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/travel-to-costa-rica-during-covid-19-what-you-need-to-know-before-you-go/

If you plan to Trip in Costa Rica, here’s what you need to know and expect if you want to visit during the global coronavirus pandemic.

The basics

Costa Rica reopened to tourism in November. The country has eased restrictions in recent weeks and plans to create a digital nomad visa to attract visitors who will make a lasting contribution to the local economy.

However, a new wave of the virus is taking off, with hospitals now “dangerously full” and the country on watch lists of other states.

What’s on offer

Costa Rica is known for its “pura vida” (pure life) and, apart from the pandemic, la vida is still pura here. It is a country for nature lovers, with both a Caribbean and Pacific coast, and a jungle covering around a quarter of the country. Whether you are here for the cloud forests, volcanoes, or the incredible nature and wildlife, your shoulders are sure to drop a few inches. Most visitors pass through the capital San José as just a passing point, but it’s a beautiful city, with stunning architecture, public art, and museums.

Who can go

Everyone. Costa Rica reopened – even for tourism – on November 1, 2020. However, there are of course restrictions. And the standard visa regulations still apply.

What are the restrictions?

It is not necessary to have a negative Covid-19 PCR test result as it was initially. All passengers must complete a Health Pass before the journey. The website gives a QR code which you must present on arrival.

Tourists traveling to Costa Rica must have valid travel insurance, which covers potential quarantine accommodation of up to $ 2,000 and medical costs of at least $ 50,000 related to Covid-19. This must be accompanied by a certificate in English or Spanish, mentioning the name of the policyholder, the dates of cover and the guarantees as stipulated above.

If you cannot purchase a policy that includes quarantine insurance, you can find suggested insurers on the Health Pass website.

Residents and Costa Rican nationals may be subject to self-isolation upon arrival.

The land borders, which had been closed to non-residents, reopened on April 5 to visitors who do not need a visa. The previous 14-day quarantine for people entering by land was also abolished on April 5.

American CDC classifies the risk in Costa Rica as “very high” and says that US citizens should “avoid all travel to Costa Rica”. Even fully vaccinated travelers are at risk of catching variants, he says.

Meanwhile, the UK has added Costa Rica to its “red list,” meaning travelers from there will be subject to around 40 hotels on June 3.

What is the situation of the Covid?

Costa Rica has recorded nearly 326,000 cases and 4,124 deaths during the pandemic, as of June 4. The number of cases is increasing rapidly during the second wave – they doubled in April.

According to the government, May saw record infection rates. Nearly 68,000 new cases were recorded in May, a record since the start of the pandemic. He also saw a record 810 people lose their lives.

On April 28, authorities warned that patients had to wait for hospital beds; two weeks later there was 432 Covid patients in intensive care nationwide, well above the optimal maximum number of 359. By May 20 the number had increased to 520. This is the most comprehensive services have been to date during the pandemic.

May 5, OPS – the Pan American Health Organization – has warned that hospitals in the region are “dangerously full”.

Along with Mexico, Costa Rica was one of the first countries in Latin America to receive vaccines in December. Over 1.6 million doses of vaccination have been administered to date, with a total of 12.81% of the population fully vaccinated. The government asked for help from Europe and the United States, using the COVAX diet.

What can visitors expect?

Things are returning to relative normality. National parks and beaches are open – the latter until 6 p.m. Restaurants and bars have reopened, but clubs haven’t, and concerts and large groups are prohibited. However, businesses must close at 11 p.m.

There is a nighttime curfew from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. Driving restrictions, which had ended, have been reinstated in an attempt to stabilize infection rates. This is done via the license plates. cars with plates ending in even numbers can run on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Cars with plates ending in odd numbers can run on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. There is a total ban on driving from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.

The beaches are open from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m. National parks allow a capacity of 50%. The bars are operating at 25% of their capacity and the hotels at 75%. Concerts, discos, fairs and other large gatherings are prohibited.

In a recovery attempt, the country plans to deploy year-round visa for digital nomads, with the possibility of renewal for an additional year. Currently, tourist stays are limited to 90 days. Applicants will be able to take their families with them and will not be subject to income tax. Digital nomads have flocked to Costa Rica These last months.

Authorities did not reinstate new restrictions for Easter week, traditionally a peak travel time, but instead urged citizens play it safe. Instead, they suggested people go to national parks, where they can be safer outside while help revive the tourism sector.

Although the number of cases is increasing, tourists continue to arrive. Dutch airline KLM announced he will resume direct flights June 29.

Useful links

Visit Costa Rica

CNE

Tico’s time

Our recent coverage

Last August, Costa Rica was one of the first countries to allow American entry, opening visitors to six US states. Or read about it reforestation project for large green macaws. Ready to book? Check what to do in San José.


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Digital nomadic visas expected in summer http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomadic-visas-expected-in-summer/ http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomadic-visas-expected-in-summer/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 16:24:15 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomadic-visas-expected-in-summer/

Greece wants to offer visas to “digital nomads”, ie professionals working remotely in another country and whose number is expected to skyrocket in the coming years.

Spurred on by research which shows the country is lagging behind in attracting digital nomads – Greece ranks 50th out of 85 countries included in a recent study – the government plans to introduce a visa program for these people in during the summer. This will be included in a bill tabled by the Ministry of Migration.

The number of digital nomads around the world is expected to reach 1 billion by 2035. Competition to attract them is fierce, but the pool is also huge.

Recent research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology estimated that if Greece could attract 100,000 digital nomads per year, and if they stayed in the country for six months on average, the annual net benefit to the economy would reach 1.3 billion euros, roughly the impact from a one-week stay of 2.5 million tourists.

Greece will highlight its relative advantages – such as natural beauty, a pleasant climate, a high standard of living, the country’s credibility in the face of emergencies, its time zone which allows coordination and communication with important time zones in the east. and in the West, its Membership of the Union, the euro zone and the Schengen area and, most recently, its rapid pace of digital transformation.

The digital nomad visa will specifically target UK citizens, as Greek officials believe Brexit will help increase the number of professionals looking to work elsewhere. The initial visa period will be double for UK nationals than for others.

The aim is that these visas, granted strictly for working outside Greece, initially stimulate the catering, real estate and tourism sectors, while some nomads may also choose to shift their tax base to Greece.

Following the incentives of the Golden Visa program for investors, there will be a 50% tax deduction for the first seven years of tax residency.


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Digital nomads in Croatia can stay a year without paying income tax http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomads-in-croatia-can-stay-a-year-without-paying-income-tax/ http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomads-in-croatia-can-stay-a-year-without-paying-income-tax/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 13:49:06 +0000 http://lostnomad.org/digital-nomads-in-croatia-can-stay-a-year-without-paying-income-tax/

Once one of the largest tourist destinations in Europe, Croatia is relying on digital nomads to contribute to the country’s economy and revive its pandemic-hit travel industry.

Croatia started offering special visas to digital workers outside the European Union in January 2021, allowing them to stay for up to a year and exempting them from income tax.

American marketing consultant Melissa Paul became Croatia’s first official digital nomad earlier this year and tells AFP why she chose this country.

Is it easy to move to Croatia?

“Croatia is beautiful, it’s nice to live here, it’s affordable compared to other places, there’s a good climate, good internet access,” says Melissa Paul.

Melissa was among over 100 people to apply in January, more than half of whom were American and British.

All she had to do to enjoy her new life in Labin, a hilltop town overlooking the Adriatic, was to prove that she was working remotely, had housing and health insurance, and that ‘she earned at least € 2,200 (RM11,092) per month.

The Croatian government has so far approved 33 visas and ministers hope the idea will take off even more once travel restrictions linked to the virus are lifted.

Why Croatia?

Croatia is at the crossroads of central and south-eastern Europe and enjoys a moderately warm, continental climate.

Tourism accounts for around a fifth of the economy of this EU country of 4.2 million people. The number of visitors has increased from 21 million in 2019 to seven million last year. Revenue also fell by more than half to € 4.8 billion in 2020 compared to the previous year.

But Croatia-based Dutch entrepreneur Jan de Jong doesn’t believe the country’s tourist reputation will disappear due to the pandemic.

He used social media last year to call on Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic to introduce the visas – and six months later they have become reality.

“Croatia as a whole, especially in the combination of things, offers a very unique experience,” said De Jong, highlighting the landscape, the connections with the rest of Europe and the Mediterranean lifestyle.

But to be successful with digital nomads, adds De Jong, Croatia needed to act “quickly and be competitive”.

Indeed, Estonia launched its nomadic visa program last year and countries like the Czech Republic and Iceland are following a similar pattern.

The Tourism Ministry, which backs De Jong’s idea, sees it as a long-term opportunity to boost the industry rather than a quick fix to the pandemic crisis.

The ministry told AFP that digital workers could become Croatia’s best promoters, spreading the word to their peers.

For Melissa Paul, the visa was her last option. She had lived in Croatia since 2014 and was married to a Croatian, but the divorce left her with no legal way to stay.

“It kept me where I love to live,” she says.

Another rhythm of life

Originally from the United States, content creator Steve Tsentserensky arrived in the country after years of globetrotting.

He spent time in New Zealand, Ukraine, France and Italy and worked on cruise ships.

But he fell in love with the Croatian “rhythm of life”.

“It’s not like everyone is rushing,” he told AFP. “You work and you can also enjoy your life. “

Melissa Paul also points out that outsiders will bring expertise and knowledge that could help the community at large.

This idea is what drives entrepreneur De Jong, who hopes the influence of foreign digital workers could help young Croats, many of whom want to leave their countries.

“They would bring their mindset and experience and can really have a positive impact on the mindset, mainly of the younger generation,” said the Dutchman, father of four.

For more information on traveling to or from Croatia you can visit their official website here.


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